Packing Light and Going Fast

by Uri

I am a big believer in going light and fast. There is even a rule for this: Rule 17: Simple and light equals freedom, agility and mobility.

Packing light allows you to move freely and to avoid many hassles while traveling. Packing light also allows you to adapt better to any situation. Your gear is minimal and you can reconfigure it to what the project needs. In cases where there is an emergency and a quick retreat is needed, having only a few things helps get ready faster.

When I'm travelling, even internationally, I just carry everything with me and I never check luggage.

On the way to the airport in Frankfurt, Germany, I was stuck in traffic for almost 1.5 hours. I barely made it to the airport in time, but because I only had a small pack I was able to return the rental car, run the big airport to my terminal, fly through security and make my gate with 20 min to spare.
Had I have a big piece of luggage, wait for the check-in line to drop the bag and get that boarding pass and then run to my gate, I would have never done it in time.

So, learn to pack light and remain nimble.

Here are some examples of packing light. Some for business, some for recon purposes, some for vacation and fun.

Packing light with a GORUCK Bullet 10

10-day trip

Another multi-day example

Winter 7 day business casual trip with some recon done

And some examples of packing lists. A sort of default go-to list of clothing for different trips.

The big problem arises when you need to bring gear. This in when knowledge and experience comes in. The more you do something, the more you know what works and what doesn't. The more you use gear, the more you know what's actually needed and what's redundant.
For gear, I tend to choose things that have more than one purpose, so I can bring less. For example, if I have a good scope during a physical recon trip, why brin binos? Add to that scope night vision, and now I also killed bringing a night scope.

Try to find the lightest versions of things you need, practice what you can do with them, and select what's needed and nothing more. Do not be tempted to bring all. Add until it's too much, then remove until you are left with the most minimal kit. Then you can go light.

Pack light and go fast. It works.

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Escape gear: how and why

By Ed Calderon

Tools I usually pick to carry for counter custody applications when moving in non permissive environments are usually dictated by the environment I'm going to be moving in. Gear needs to be endemic specific.

The bondage elements usually present in some places is easy to research and needs to be taken in to account as part of your pre movement planing. What types of restraints are used by criminals in the area? Are the government forces in the area you are moving in friendly to you or are the compromised in some way? Do the carry handcuffs? What brand usually? Is it worth concealing a key to a cuff that is not present in the area? Do your homework ....

Picture number 1 shows some of the tools I have on rotation.

Handcuffkeys, one an advanced handcuff key from Oscar Delta and a plastic key from Shomertec ( redundancy and non magnetic options, it's better to have one of each ), I modified the plastic key with an angle grind to make it easier to use at odd angles.

Handcuff split paw shims from SerePick, Gulag Shim from Oscar Delta. Again redundancy and septate placement on the body. These are always paired with a key, double locked cuffs will make these shim usable so it's good to have options.

SAD Tool by Oscar Delta witch is basically a multy tool that includes, padlock shims, handcuff pick and shim capable bits and easy decoder. This one is a constant with me.

Cutting implements in the form of ceramic razors ( hidden in a tag in this case, thungsten cutting bit and jewlers wire, razor blades, coin Knives and kevlar cordage. All these I try and infuse in to clothing or skin contact concelment options, like latex and new skin mixed media hides. Concelment and access this is the balance. Cutting implements are needed not just for cutting restraints, they can also make other things or modify things around you. It can also be used as a weapon. From rezor boxing to garrote methods with cord. Remember mindset and software can weaponize most things.

Bogota picks. These are just self explanatory.

Mini Chemlights are spread around. Amazingly useful when trying to manipulate things in the dark, mark places or people and signaling. I even used them in conjunction with a mouse trap to spray glow liquid on a permitir Intruder to make them in to glowing targets.

Pictures 2 is an image of some of the most successful concelment spots on the body that I have seen. Remember access and concealment, each one of you has to find this balance in what you carry and how you carry it, what work for me might not work for you.

Avoid concealing anything in clothing that could be lost in a full contact football match. Baseball caps, watches, shoes, jackets, Paracord bracelets etc are all things that usually get lost or taken away in most initial contact and purging portions of an irregular Custody event.

Last picture is of a small concelment tube. This is one of a few I have collected over the years. It came from a drug mule. A very successful one. Interesting about it is the size and materials used ( bamboo) all tried and true. Usually the individual who carried it would put in inside a condom to then conceal up an orifice ( butt ) end of the condom would be tied and used to pull it out when need.

Most of my material has a criminal origin. So some of its detailed elements have a history.

Stillness is death.

Keeping Engagement Data Secure

By Uri

One of the things I think it's crucial during an engagement, is keeping the information about your customer or target, and the information you extract from them secure. There is a need to both keep their privacy and security tight. In the case of a customer, the data you extract belongs to them, and it may contain highly confidential information. It is extremely important to handle this information in a secure way, as much as possible.

Project Name and Customer Name

One thing I like to do, is to give each customer a codename. This will allow me to talk about the customer to another member of a team on a semi-open location (an office, or on the phone) without disclosing who the customer is.
This is also good if you are sitting with another customer, and a call comes in. You can talk about certain things only referring to the customer by its codename. This way you keep each customer's privacy and OPSEC. Unless specifically allowed to use a customer as reference, you should never mention customer names.

The same can be applied to projects within a certain customer. As you may have yearly projects, or even different projects with the same customer, having codewords for projects will help you keep the data organized. Also, it will help compartmentalize this data. Often, you can get a project within a customer that requires your team members to have a security clearance, for example. Those that have no security clearance, and therefore are not part of this project, shouldn't have access to it. This includes client name and project name. So, sometimes within the team you can benefit from having a codeword for projects.

Both customer and project name compartmentalization is part of OPSEC and you should decide what and how it is applied.

Project Data

Project data includes scan results, OSINT dumps, email addressed captures, credentials, and exfiltrated data, among other things. Anything that is collected from and about the customer or target, should be considered sensitive data.
Efforts should be put in place to keep that information secure. Personally, I do a combination of things. I use:

  • Per engagement external USB backup drive
  • Per engagement USB thumb drive
  • Per engagement completely wiped and re-installed laptop

I store all the data about and from the customer or target encrypted on the backup drive. I might dump all the data at the end of the day, or I might copy it as I find it, but all data ultimately goes there.
If I need to use a USB thumb drive, I use only the one assigned to this project (as much as possible, exceptions will occur). Again data copied to it, will be copied to the backup drive at the end of the day.

At the end of the engagement with a customer, and after the report is done and briefed, I usually ask the customer if he wants to keep his data, or he rather I keep it or destroy it. Since all it's stored in one place, it's easy to destroy or safely store on a safe location. And if the customer chooses to get his data back, as it is his right, it's easy to transfer this to him.

In cases where data comes from a target, having it all sorted and encrypted in one drive, allows for better storage, and transfer to law enforcement or other organizations.

End of Engagement

At the end of the engagement, it is important to wipe the laptop clean and re-install a new operating system and software. Be ready for the next engagement.

Welcome to TTPs

Since many people seemed to be interested in knowing how Dan and Uri do stuff in places, we figured we would open a section where both of them can share tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs) with you. This includes tools, ways of doing things and details about what works and what doesn't.

Standby for traffic.

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